Here’s why Trump likely won’t be removed from office

National

HONOLULU (KHON2) — The riot at the U.S. Capitol building has lawmakers calling for President Trump’s removal from office once again. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is calling for the 25th Amendment of the Constitution to be invoked.

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All four of Hawaii’s members of Congress are in favor of removing Trump, but according to one political analyst, it is unlikely given time constraints and the fact that Trump still has many supporters in Washington.

Many across the country watched in horror and disbelief as the Capitol was taken by force on Wednesday, Jan. 6. Hawaii’s members of Congress are calling for action.

U.S. Rep. Kai Kahele said, he never could have imagined in his first four days of office that he would be signing articles of impeachment to remove the President.

“But that is exactly what is needed right now,” Kahele said. “The President of the United States is a national disgrace. He must be removed from office.”

In a statement, U.S. Sen. Brian Schatz said: “Trump is a danger to democracy itself. I took an oath to defend the Constitution against all enemies, foreign and domestic. We must both initiate impeachment proceedings in the House of Representatives and invoke the 25th Amendment. Our vigilance must increase, not wane, in the final days.”

U.S. Sen. Mazie Hirono also agreed that removing Trump is the best coarse of action.

“I would support immediate removal. And frankly, the most immediate way for that to happen is for Vice President Pence and the remaining members of his cabinet those who haven’t abandoned ship already to invoke the 25th amendment, that would be the fastest way to deem him unfit to continue to serve,” Hirono explained.

But is there enough time with less than two weeks left in his term? And how likely is it to happen?

Political analyst Dr. John Hart explained the ways Congress could seek to remove Trump.

“There’s impeachment,” Dr. Hart said. “And there’s invoking the 25th Amendment. That’s separate.”

Hart said, the impeachment process would take too long.

“We’ve been through that process before. And with Trump, and once again, that problem is going to be there. There’s simply not enough time in terms of what it takes to draw up articles (of impeachment), go through the House, have a hearing, go to the Senate, get it booked, have a hearing, have a trial and have a vote. This very Senate has already voted against the Trump impeachment conviction on the basis of speed. So if they thought last time was too quick, they’re going to say it was too quick this time,” Hart explained.

He said, invoking the 25th Amendment to the Constitution could be done quickly.

If Vice President Mike Pence and the majority of Trump’s Cabinet deem the President unfit, Pence would become acting president.

Trump would have four days to contest, and Congress would have to vote on it, but during that process Pence would remain president. The process would effectively remove Trump from power until Joe Biden is sworn into office on Wednesday, Jan. 20.

“(Invoking the 25th amendment) could get through quick enough. But politically, it’s not going to happen,” Hart said.

Hirono also has doubts.

“One hopes that rather than simply abandoning ship as a number of his cabinet people and others are already doing, they should recognize how (Trump) is still a continuing danger to our country. They should do the right thing, but I am not holding my breath,” Hirono said.

Hart said, there are benefits to going through the process even if he thinks it is unlikely Trump will be ousted.

“I think, is it good for the democrats to raise these issues,” Hart said. “I think the country needs to be put on notice as to how serious things are.”

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