Longtime coach disappointed by recent resignations, conflicts with parents

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Several coaches have resigned from Oahu high schools since the school year began.

Wendell Say just completed his 38th year of coaching at Aiea High School. For most of those years, he headed Na Alii football, but he’s also coached track and basketball.

Say says he’s seen drastic changes over the years. “If you look at what has changed the most in all the years I’ve coached, I’d say the parents and not the kids,” he said.

In the last four months, there have been at least two physical altercations reported involving a parent and a high school coach.

The first involved Kaiser High School football coach Arnold Martinez, who resigned after an alleged altercation after a parent meeting in September.

Earlier this week, Roosevelt High School girls basketball coach Chad Kaihe resigned after he was allegedly assaulted after a game a couple of weeks ago.

Roosevelt principal Sean Wong says he believes the issue has been handled, and did not wish to comment out of respect for all parties involved.

Say said he’s disappointed about hearing about the recent incidents.

Other coaches KHON2 contacted said there seems to be a sense of entitlement with parents expecting their child to play.

“I think if you look at what’s been happening, it’s not just here,” Say said. “The same thing happens on the mainland, different parts of the mainland.”

Being a coach doesn’t pay as well as people think. According to the Department of Education, a football coach makes $3,739 if they also teach at the school.

A basketball coach makes $2,867.

“(If you’re) going do it, you’re going do it for the kids, because it ain’t the money,” Say said.

KHON2 contacted Carolyn Quindica from the Positive Coaching Alliance to see how the organization works to resolve conflicts between parents and coaches.

“We find that the way that they really have this culture change is by having the live workshops, where we are teaching parents, the most influential folks in our lives regarding sports,” Quindica said. “It is more about the life lessons and providing an environment that is fun and safe and encouraging.”

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