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Aftermath of king tides on Maui and Oahu

HONOLULU (KHON2) - Debris, erosion and big waves, that's what folks across the state saw in the wake of hurricane Hector, which happened to coincide with the king tides.

Known for its fine sand and clear water, Waimanalo Beach had debris littered across the sand Friday morning. 

"I knew Hector was looming and king tides coming and I was almost positive there was going to be impacts and you can see here, there is a line of debris that goes from the edge of Waimanalo all the way down to Bellows," said Kahi Pacarro, Executive Director of Sustainable Coastlines Hawaii. 

Just down the road from Waimanalo Beach Park, you could see how high the tide was yesterday, while watching today's higher tide come in. 

"Yesterday, we had high surf along our south and south-east shores because of hurricane Hector as it passed south of state and it corresponded with the highest predicted tides of the year," said National Weather Service meteorologist Bob Burke. 

Over on Maui, one car was engulfed by a wave—leaving it damaged at Maalaea Harbor.

"With the storm surge like that, I've never seen the waves get that big," said Aaron Bement who works at Maalaea Harbor. "I've seen them (waves) where the cars get wet, but never like swamped like they did yesterday."

I showed the photos to meteorologist Burke. 

"That's definitely the wave action more than likely from Hector," Burke said. "Having the higher tides, it's easy for waves to inundate low-lying areas because of high tides."

At Hanakaoo Beach in West Maui, the beach was almost wiped out. The tide reaching all the way to the tree line.

The tide today was predicted to be the highest of the year, but the effects were far less damaging.

"We're in a new moon phase and we have these high tides, and I believe today is the highest predicted tide for the month and possibly for the year," he said. "Luckily, today the surf is down quite a bit from yesterday."
 


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