MAKAHA, Hawaii (KHON2) — Stanley Black & Decker was created in 1843 and is the world’s largest tool company. It operates nearly 50 manufacturing facilities across America and over 100  globally. The company established the Global Impact Challenge in 2021 which created the Stanley Black & Decker Makers Grant as a means of providing grant funding to support trade workforce development initiatives in the construction and manufacturing sectors.

The grant is a $25 million dollar five-year program that seeks out non-profits in the U.S. that support workforce development.

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One such non-profit that was named a recipient of the grant is the Mākaha Learning Center. Out of 192 applicant organizations, Black & Decker chose 91 to receive the five-year funding. Each non-profit will be given a portion of the $25 million to further develop their programs.

“Mākaha Learning Center is thrilled to begin 2023 as one of the recipients of the Stanley Black & Decker Makers Grant. We at Mākaha Learning Center would like to express our gratitude to this organization for investing in the futures of Native Hawaiians and residents of the Wai’anae Coast,” said Mākaha Learning Center President, Danielle “Duckie” Irwin.

According to Mākaha Learning Center, they are keen to serve their community through whatever means necessary in order to break the culture of poverty in the Mākaha area. They said that the organization works hard to provide impactful programs.

“Stanley Black & Decker is immensely proud to support Makaha Learning Center as they work to skill and reskill the next generation of trade professionals. Currently in the U.S., there are an estimated 650,000 open construction jobs and 10 million unfilled manufacturing jobs globally,” said Stanley Black & Decker Corporate Responsibility Officer, Deb Geyer.

  • Students at the Mākaha Learning Center learn professional and workforce development in January 2023 in Mākaha, Hawai'i. (Photo/Mākaha Learning Center)
  • Students at the Mākaha Learning Center learn professional and workforce development in January 2023 in Mākaha, Hawai'i. (Photo/Mākaha Learning Center)
  • Students at the Mākaha Learning Center learn professional and workforce development in January 2023 in Mākaha, Hawai'i. (Photo/Mākaha Learning Center)

“Our purpose is to support ‘Those Who Make the World,’ and being able to fund educational programs and non-profits that are revitalizing trade careers directly connects to our core mission. Thanks to this year’s Makers Grant Recipients. Together, we will be one step closer to closing the trade skills gap,” explained Geyer.

Mākaha Learning Center began its journey nearly ten years ago. Its primary mission is to provide training and opportunity to Native Hawaiians and the peoples of the Wai’anae Coast.

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MCL espouses three foundations of learning — Ho’oponopono [forgiveness], Ho’omau [steadfastness] and Ho’onua [generosity]. Through these learning philosophies, MCL helps students acquire trade skills and life skills that will create a foundation for success.