Hawaii weather hot and muggy due to Ela

Local News

The remnants of tropical cyclone Ela continue to move west across the islands.

The National Weather Service said the system is bringing light winds and dew points in the mid-70s to go along with typically hot July temperatures. This will produce afternoon heat indices near 100 degrees.

Stronger winds and lower humidity will spread over the area early in the week.

There is an advisory on one of the remaining tropical storms in the area of the islands: Tropical storm Iune is located 520 miles south-southwest of Lihue. Tropical storm Halola has since moved on further west, away from the islands. Tropical storm Iune is not impacting Hawaii’s weather.

Elsewhere, no tropical cyclones are expected through Tuesday afternoon.

The following information was provided by the Central Pacific Hurricane Center as of 11 a.m.:

TS HalolaTS Iune
Location12.8N 179.9W14.7N 161.1W
ABOUT 745 MI…1200 KM WSW OF JOHNSTON ISLANDABOUT 515 MI…830 KM SSW OF LIHUE HAWAII
ABOUT 990 MI…1600 KM ESE OF WAKE ISLANDABOUT 575 MI…925 KM ESE OF JOHNSTON ISLAND
Maximum sustained winds60 MPH…95 KM/H35 MPH…55 KM/H
Present movementWNW or 300 degrees AT 13 MPH…20 KM/HWSW or 245 degrees AT 9 MPH…15 KM/H
Minimum central pressure999 MB…29.50 INCHES1006 MB…29.71 INCHES

Less than 24 hours after turning into the Central Pacific’s first tropical storm of the season, Ela weakened to a tropical depression.

Four-E increased in strength late Wednesday night to become Tropical Storm Ela, the first tropical storm in the Central Pacific. But it was downgraded once again to a tropical depression Thursday evening. It weakened even further into a post-tropical cyclone Friday morning.

Even though Ela will not hit Hawaii, it’s always a good idea to be prepared, especially during hurricane season.

Forecasters say Hawaii could see another active storm season this year thanks to El Nino, which causes warmer temperatures in the Pacific northern hemisphere. Warm water makes storms spawn and survive. The season ends Nov. 30.

“We’re into July now, we are going to be heading toward the peak of hurricane season in August and September so this is the time of year we start seeing things fire up,” said Robert Ballard, National Weather Service science and operations officer.

“The last couple of hurricanes that we were expecting to come in, I wasn’t prepared enough, but I see a lot of people who do,” said Honolulu resident Reginald Apilado.

“I don’t personally prepare that much just like the basics, like water and a hot plate and canned food,” said Honolulu resident Giulia Bradley.

Last year, when a tropical depression headed toward Hawaii, many people rushed to the stores and water was one of the first items to go.

“We hope people already got their supplies for the season at the start of the season, but if they haven’t, now might be the good time to start thinking about getting those supplies ready,” Ballard said.

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